Can hypnotherapy cure anxiety and panic attacks on the Tube?

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Liz Connor / 6 days ago / Abstract:

If you live in London, you’ll know that the morning commute can be uncomfortable at the best of times. Squeezing into a miniscule space with several other people’s unpleasant body odours is no one’s idea of fun.

For most people, including myself, my journey to work was merely an irritating daily chore to endure. Every morning I’d switch off from my surrounds by listening to a podcast or attempting to squeeze my book into a tiny gap of space underneath my fellow commuter’s armpits, tuning out from the hustle and bustle around me.

That was, until two years ago, when I boarded a Piccadilly Line train from Earls Court to Leicester Square at rush hour.

Half way between Knightsbridge and Green Park, the packed tube train pulled to a standstill in a section of the tunnel.

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This is nothing out of the ordinary. If you use the London Underground system regularly, you’ll know that the trains are prone to stopping and starting and the nature of rush hour means that the trains can trundle along at a snail’s pace.

As we patiently waited for the train to move along, the driver announced that a passenger had been taken ill on the train in front of us, explaining that we may be stuck in the tunnel for some time while the paramedics dealt with the situation.

It was only a minute later when I felt the train switch off around me, that I became acutely aware of the fact that we were underground with very little space to move.

Before I could register my own thoughts, I felt a sudden surge of panic swell through my body as I became all too aware of the fact I was trapped, underground in a busy crowd of strangers.

I struggled to breathe, my hands started shaking and it felt as though the train was closing in around me. In one minute I’d gone from calm to having an uncontrollable panic attack.

I had lived in London for nine years and been on countless trains that had pulled to a standstill with no problem. So as you can imagine, this overwhelming loss of control came as a distressing surprise to me.

If you’ve experienced Tube panic before, it can feel like you’re the only person that’s suffering and, even worse, like you’re going crazy. The reality is that two in three people are affected by mental health issues at some point in their lives, and experiencing panic attacks in public, although embarrassing and terrifying, is not unusual.

With the additional fear of panic, the basic act of journeying to and from work can be an exhausting and unbearable ordeal.

Unwilling to be deterred by this debilitating new development, I decided to see if hypnotherapy could help.

…………………

I had no idea what to expect from hypnotherapy. If, like me, you’re a newbie, you’re probably imagining swinging pocket watches and being put into a deep sleep. Neither of these things happen.

……………..

One of the tasks is to imagine myself replaying the moment I had a panic attack on a train, and rewind to a time where I felt safe on the Tube. This didn’t stand out to me during the sessions themselves – but the exercise has proved to be a helpful tool whenever I’m stuck in a claustrophobic situation.

……………..

On the way home, I take the Tube, and my fear has significantly lessened.

I wouldn’t say my discomfort with being Underground has completely gone – hypnotherapy isn’t a ‘quick cure’, but a basis for building healthy thoughts. It’s certainly helped to the point where I can take the train every day and no longer feel like I have to avoid the Underground.

If you’re suffering from Tube panic, there are ways to resolve your past traumas and change your automatic response to being underground. The first stage is seeking help.

…………………………

Coping with Tube phobia

In order to have a phobia you need to have belief about travelling on the Tube. You say something in your head, make a picture in your mind and have certain feelings associated with it – even breathe differently. By changing these actions you can change your experience.

Make it humorous

A quick method to change this pattern is to change the way you approach the fear. Imagine the Benny Hill theme tune playing as you think of getting on the Tube. If you have an inner dialogue that you say in your head i.e. “tubes are stressful”, repeat that to yourself in a high-pitched Mickey Mouse voice. This will make the idea of boarding the Tube much less daunting.

Scramble the negative emotions

Another helpful tip is to scramble the negative images that you associate with the travelling on the Tube. What would it be like if you made that image small? What would it be like if you make it black and white? Imagine running the whole event backwards, like you’re rewinding a DVD.

Create a positive trigger

Think of or imagine a time when you felt completely calm and relaxed i.e. sitting on a beach or being around people you love.

Imagine going back to that time and notice all the images, feelings and sounds that go with this event. When you have fully connected to this positive event, squeeze your fist to create a link between the emotion and the gesture, and as the emotion fades release your fist.

Keep repeating this as many times as you like and then test it by squeezing your fist while thinking of what you are fearful of when getting on the Tube. Notice what you feel now. If it’s strong enough, next time you get on, just the act of squeezing your fist will bring back that calm feeling and reduce your fear of travelling on the Uunderground.

Be aware that this requires homework, so make sure you regularly repeat this process to maintain the positive feelings this new positive trigger should create.

Full article and original source: http://www.standard.co.uk/lifestyle/health/can-hypnotherapy-cure-anxiety-and-panic-attacks-on-the-tube-a3536716.html

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Mother, 43, cures herself by ‘thinking herself better’ after a one in a million nerve condition left her unable to smile, speak or even shut her eyes

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  • Dipti Tait, 43, from the Cotswolds, woke one morning unable to move her lips
  • Within hours she lost feeling across her face and had to tape her eyes to sleep
  • Doctors wanted to see if her condition would improve naturally without therapy
  • Taking matters into her own hands, Ms Tait devised a hypnotherapy programme 
  • A year later, she is able to smile and speak again thanks to ‘mind over matter’

A mother-of-two whose face was paralysed by a nerve disease is now grinning from ear to ear, after self-hypnosis restored her smile.

Dipti Tait, 43, from the Cotswolds, woke one morning unable to move her lips and, within hours, had lost feeling across her entire face – meaning she couldn’t smile and had to tape her eyes shut to sleep.

Unable to smile, speak, or chew, doctors diagnosed Ms Tait with a rare nerve disease, known as Miller Fisher syndrome.

Doctors hoped her condition would improve without intervention, yet, Ms Tait, a qualified hypnotherapist, was insistent she could ‘think herself better’ using self-hypnosis.

A year later, her symptoms disappeared, which Ms Tait credits to ‘mind over matter’

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Ms Tait began feeling ill while on a romantic holiday with her partner, photographic retoucher, Toby Sillence, 43, in March 2013.

She complained of feeling lethargic, sensitive to light and experiencing pain in her shoulder.

A week later during a family meal back at home, Ms Tait stopped being able to feel her lips.

She said: ‘It was so frightening. My expression was frozen. I had a permanent poker face.’

‘The sensation spread and by that afternoon, three hours later, I couldn’t blink. I couldn’t talk. I had to talk through my teeth, like I was pretending to be a ventriloquist. I couldn’t even chew.

‘It was like being at the dentist and having anaesthetic. It was really scary.’

After initially being diagnosed with Bell’s Palsy – a temporary condition that causes muscle weakness on one side of the face, Ms Tait sought a second opinion and was diagnosed with Miller Fisher syndrome after brain scans and blood tests.

Doctors wanted to see if Ms Tait’s facial movement would return naturally and just gave her eye drops to help her close her dry eyes.

Yet, Ms Tait decided to take matters into her own hands after her ‘poker face’ distressed her sons Jacob, then 10, and Krishan, then 11, and provoked disapproving stares from strangers.

She said: ‘I looked grumpy and my boys got upset. They thought I was looking at them disapprovingly. They worried about me.

‘I had to say to them I was smiling in my head.

‘I was plunged in to an unsmiling world and I got depressed.

‘A few people asked if I’d had a stroke and I saw strangers staring at me.

‘I didn’t want to go out or speak to people. I felt so self-conscious.’

Ms Tait was also forced to blend her food into smoothies.

She therefore decided to use her hypnotherapy skills on herself by devising a programme alongside a physiotherapist that included imagining herself mouthing the words ‘bop’ and ‘pop’ in the mirror.

Ms Tait said: ‘I did this for 20 minutes every day, hoping to create muscle memory.

‘I couldn’t feel the words, but I imagined myself saying them and I could slowly see the feeling coming back.’

She also looked at pictures and videos of herself smiling, and listened to an MP3 of her talking about self-esteem and confidence each night as she slept.

By May 2013, Ms Tait’s confidence had improved enough to throw herself a 40th birthday party to celebrate the milestone with her loved ones.

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She said: ‘I still couldn’t speak much, but I had movement back in half my face and half my smile back.

‘Everyone said “you look fine” and “you look beautiful”. They were all supportive.

‘I still couldn’t eat though, so people offered to put my birthday cake in a blender!’

By continuing her hypnosis programme, Ms Tait was able to smile and feel her face again by that December.

She said: ‘By using self-hypnosis, I’ve really proved that mind over matter and thinking yourself better can work.’

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-4464910/Mother-used-hypnotherapy-cure-paralysing-condition.html#ixzz4gh0qE53P
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ONLY ON 3: Hypnotherapy for athletics to academics, a growing trend for parents

hdr_brandingCHATTANOOGA, TN (WRCB) –

ABSTRACT: A growing trend has parents hypnotizing their kids to do better in sports and in the classroom.

It’s called “hypno-parenting” and those parents say it works! Some local parents swear by it, saying hypnosis therapy has really helped their child overcome big fears they thought they’d never get over.

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This practice has it’s critics too, therapists say it’s not be for everyone.

“The word hypnosis is kind of creepy and I would be the first person to say yea no,” said parent Salida Brooks.

Local mom Salida Brooks says she was scared of hypnotherapy practices at first, but willing to try anything to get over her long time fear of going to the dentist.

” There’s stuff that we store in our deeper mind that we don’t always know that we have in there,” said Brooks.

After a few sessions of “reworking” her subconscious mind, Brooks found a new perspective.

” It was a completely different experience, I was asking them what they were doing and was not nervous at all and watched them on the video camera with things and it was very different,” said Brooks.

She later tried the therapy with her 7-year- old daughter who’s also afraid of the dentist.

” We were in a little private area and so I used some of the techniques I know from my training,” said Brooks. ” Within 10 minutes, I had a completely different child.”

Leah had several teeth pulled that day with no problems.

” She walked back there by herself and said ‘bye mommy’ and put the mask on and she was fine and has been fine every since,” said Brooks.

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Competitive cheerleader Kendall Kukta tells Channel 3, she tried hypnosis as a last resort. 13794142_G

” It definitely wasn’t what I expected, it felt like it made you feel really good,” said Kendall Kukta, 14-years-old. “Other than helping you through being scared or whatever you’re going through…It helps you just really feel good about yourself.”

Kukta was unable to tumble on her own after a bad fall. She feared she’d be kicked off the team after years of private lessons and no luck.

Three hypnosis sessions later, she’s made the High School squad.

” I think it made me believe in myself a little bit more and be able to visualize myself doing it so that I can do it,” said Kukta.

Full article available at: http://www.wrcbtv.com/story/35342767/only-on-3-hypnotherapy-for-athletics-to-academics-a-growing-trend-for-parents

NLP: Decoding mental maps

Understand your subconscious mind through Neuro Linguistic Programming

Deepika Sahu | May 19, 2012, 12.00 AM IST

NLP:  Decoding mental maps (Thinkstock photos/Getty Images)NLP: Decoding mental maps (Thinkstock photos/Getty Images)
Understand your subconscious mind through Neuro Linguistic ProgrammingNLP or Neuro Linguistic Programming is the new technology of achievement. In NLP, neuro is derived from nerves, which represents behaviour. ‘Linguistic’ is derived from language, which means structure and ‘Programming’ is borrowed from computers, which means creating change. Thus, NLP creates structured behavioural changes in your attitude. NLP improves conceptual skills, analytical ability and stress management skills.

NLP (Neuro Linguistic Programming) was created by psychotherapist John Grinder, mathematician and psychologist Richard Bandler in association with Dr. Erikson, a leading hypnotherapist. Bandler and Grinder have since split and are separately teaching their own versions of NLP to their respective students. NLP originated in the research labs of the University of California at Santa Cruz, and evolved as late as the 1990’s. In NLP is this software. Software for relaxing the body, mind and soul!

Corporate trainers using NLP maintains, “NLP can be put to use in a variety of diverse corporate and individual environments, but it is most commonly used for stress management, healing, goal-setting, goal achievement, communication, motivation and team-building. How can managers benefit from NLP? NLP meditation techniques develop the fine art of aligning your energy in tune with the universal energy. This reduces stress levels as managers begin to be guided by the infinite intelligence within them. NLP meditation and tribal music for relaxation help them to be calm while making crucial business decisions.”
NLP researchers have discovered that people have three basic methods of perceiving the world based on their unconscious mental maps, namely visual, auditory and kinesthetic. All of us have one of these preferred mental maps in our unconscious mind. The important point about these mental maps is that these modes are the preferred modes of thinking! A visual person is most comfortable when you show him colorful brochures. It is his most natural way of understanding the world.
NLP researchers believe that In India, 35 per cent of us are visuals, 35 per cent are auditories, and the rest of us are kinesthetics. NLP research indicates that visuals respond to colour therapy, fire music and creative visualisation exercises. Similarly, auditories respond to music therapy, auto-suggestion and water music. Kinesthetics respond to massage therapy and clapping therapy. These relaxation techniques program their unconscious mind and help them manage stress more effectively.

It is all a matter of using the appropriate programming technique to achieve higher goals in life. NLP shows you this way.

 

HYPNOSIS: RESEARCHERS STARTING TO UNCOVER ITS SCIENTIFIC BASIS

Guest April 22, 2017, – ReliaWire.com

Some argue that hypnosis is just a trick. Others, however, see it as bordering on the paranormal – mysteriously transforming people into mindless robots.hypnosis-Surian-Soosay-Flickr-680x350

Now our recent review of a number of research studies on the topic reveals it is actually neither. Hypnosis may just be an aspect of normal human behavior.

Hypnosis refers to a set of procedures involving an induction – which could be fixating on an object, relaxing or actively imagining something – followed by one or more suggestions, such as “You will be completely unable to feel your left arm”. The purpose of the induction is to induce a mental state in which participants are focused on instructions from the experimenter or therapist, and are not distracted by everyday concerns.

One reason why hypnosis is of interest to scientists is that participants often report that their responses feel automatic or outside their control.

Most inductions produce equivalent effects. But inductions aren’t actually that important. Surprisingly, the success of hypnosis doesn’t rely on special abilities of the hypnotist either – although building rapport with them will certainly be valuable in a therapeutic context.

Rather, the main driver for successful hypnosis is one’s level of “hypnotic suggestibility”. This is a term which describes how responsive we are to suggestions. We know that hypnotic suggestibility doesn’t change over time and is heritable. Scientists have even found that people with certain gene variants are more suggestible.

Hypnosis Responiveness

Most people are moderately responsive to hypnosis. This means they can have vivid changes in behavior and experience in response to hypnotic suggestions. By contrast, a small percentage (around 10-15%) of people are mostly non-responsive. But most research on hypnosis is focused on another small group (10-15%) who are highly responsive.

In this group, suggestions can be used to disrupt pain, or to produce hallucinations and amnesia.

Considerable evidence from brain imaging reveals that these individuals are not just faking or imagining these responses. Indeed, the brain acts differently when people respond to hypnotic suggestions than when they imagine or voluntarily produce the same responses.

Preliminary research has shown that highly suggestible individuals may have unusual functioning and connectivity in the prefrontal cortex. This is a brain region that plays a critical role in a range of psychological functions including planning and the monitoring of one’s mental states.

There is also some evidence that highly suggestible individuals perform more poorly on cognitive tasks known to depend on the prefrontal cortex, such as working memory. However, these results are complicated by the possibility that there might be different subtypes of highly suggestible individuals.

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These neurocognitive differences may lend insights into how highly suggestible individuals respond to suggestions: they may be more responsive because they’re less aware of the intentions underlying their responses.

For example, when given a suggestion to not experience pain, they may suppress the pain but not be aware of their intention to do so. This may also explain why they often report that their experience occurred outside their control. Neuroimaging studies have not as yet verified this hypothesis but hypnosis does seem to involve changes in brain regions involved in monitoring of mental states, self-awareness and related functions.

Although the effects of hypnosis may seem unbelievable, it’s now well accepted that beliefs and expectations can dramatically impact human perception. It’s actually quite similar to the placebo response, in which an ineffective drug or therapeutic treatment is beneficial purely because we believe it will work.

In this light, perhaps hypnosis isn’t so bizarre after all. Seemingly sensational responses to hypnosis may just be striking instances of the powers of suggestion and beliefs to shape our perception and behavior. What we think will happen morphs seamlessly into what we ultimately experience.

Hypnosis requires the consent of the participant or patient. You cannot be hypnotised against your will and, despite popular misconceptions, there is no evidence that hypnosis could be used to make you commit immoral acts against your will.

Hypnosis As Medical Treatment

Meta-analyses, studies that integrate data from many studies on a specific topic, have shown that hypnosis works quite well when it comes to treating certain conditions. These include irritable bowel syndrome and chronic pain. But for other conditions, however, such as smoking, anxiety, or post-traumatic stress disorder, the evidence is less clear cut – often because there is a lack of reliable research.

But although hypnosis can be valuable for certain conditions and symptoms, it’s not a panacea. Anyone considering seeking hypnotherapy should do so only in consultation with a trained professional. Unfortunately, in some countries, including the UK, anyone can legally present themselves as a hypnotherapist and start treating clients.

However, anyone using hypnosis in a clinical or therapeutic context needs to have conventional training in a relevant discipline, such as clinical psychology, medicine, or dentistry to ensure that they are sufficiently expert in that specific area.

We believe that hypnosis probably arises through a complex interaction of neurophysiological and psychological factors – some described here and others unknown. It also seems that these vary across individuals.

But as researchers gradually learn more, it has become clear that this captivating phenomenon has the potential to reveal unique insights into how the human mind works. This includes fundamental aspects of human nature, such as how our beliefs affect our perception of the world and how we come to experience control over our actions.

Authors: Devin Terhune, Lecturer in Psychology, Goldsmiths, University of London and Steven Jay Lynn, Distinguished Professor of Psychology & Director of The Psychological Clinic, Binghamton University, State University of New York

This article was originally published on The Conversation. Top Image: Surian Soosay/Flickr

URL: http://reliawire.com/hypnosis-research-scientific-basis/

‘I WAS A 27-YEAR-OLD SKELETON WITH THE BONES OF AN 80-YEAR-OLD’: WOMAN WHO BATTLED ANOREXIA FOR 15 YEARS ON HOW HYPNOTHERAPY HELPED HER RECOVER FROM THE BRINK OF DEATH

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Millie Thomas, 29, suffered from anorexia for 15 years of her life . She first developed the eating disorder when she was just 12 years old . She started to exercise obsessively despite being malnourished from not eating.  Ms Thomas was later told by doctors that she had just two weeks to live.  Now recovered, she is helping others who are suffering from eating disorders.

Millie Thomas has spent more than half her life battling anorexia.

The 29-year-old, who lives on the Sunshine Coast, Queensland, was consumed by the disease for 15 years and several times, was sure it would take her life.

Now recovered, Ms Thomas has opened up about the inner turmoil that she faced over the years, the relentless nature of the disease and how she recovered from the brink of death to go on to help others with eating disorders.

For Ms Thomas, her eating disorder ‘snowballed’ when she was 12 after she started at an all girls private school in Auckland.

Millie Thomas (pictured recently)  has spent more than half her life battling anorexiaMillie Thomas (pictured recently)  has spent more than half her life battling anorexia

‘I felt a little bit vulnerable and like most girls I wanted to fit into the cool crowd. To do this I felt like I had to lose weight for summer,’ Ms Thomas told Daily Mail Australia.

‘For me it just blew up from there. I started making my own lunches and then I wasn’t eating lunch at all and then I was hiding my dinner and skipping breakfast by saying I had to leave early to go to sport training.

‘I didn’t know at the time that people are genetically predisposed to eating disorders so once I had lost a certain amount of weight the thoughts just took over my body.’

Within just a few months, Ms Thomas’ weight had plummeted and she had fallen deep into the grips of anorexia.

‘At that age people were noticing at school but they didn’t know what to do – and I’m sure people also felt as if they said anything it could be detrimental,’ Ms Thomas said.

‘I was taken out of school and hospitalised. Doctors got my weight back up but they never changed my anorexic way of thinking, my ED mentality and that is a flaw in the system that still remains today.’

Ms Thomas’ family tried everything to help her – from doctors and psychiatrists to psychologists and Narrative Therapy, FBT and CBT – but nothing was getting through.

‘I wasn’t living I was existing. I went to school and topped my subjects and was a perfectionist but I barely ate or drank a thing,’ Ms Thomas said.

‘I had an image in my head of what I wanted to be but I had no idea that the perception I had of my own body was completely distorted. I was sure I was seeing the correct thing in the mirror,’ Ms Thomas said

‘I was counting every single kilojoule I ate each day and while I was seeing psychologists a lot of the time I wasn’t mentally ready to give up my desire and drive to be “thin”.

‘I had an image in my head of what I wanted to be but I had no idea that the perception I had of my own body was completely distorted. I was sure I was seeing the correct thing in the mirror.’

 If I hadn’t expended enough calories I would stand in my room and run on the spot.

Ms Thomas, who battled the illness all the way through school and well into her twenties, described herself as being ‘trapped in my thinking’.

‘I was eating but I was eating the exact same thing every single day and I was exercising obsessively,’ she explained.

‘I would exercise at the same time every day and if I decided that I needed to do extra the next day I would have to do that same extra exercise again. I would wake up even if I hadn’t eaten anything the day before and still had to exercise.’

Before bed each night, Ms Thomas would calculate what she had eaten that day – even if it was just three apple slices – and see how many calories she had expended.

‘If I hadn’t expended enough calories I would stand in my room and run on the spot,’ she said.

It got so obsessive that Ms Thomas got six stress fractures in her hips because she had exercised while her body was in a state of malnutrition.

‘It’s almost like you are looking down on yourself. You want to get well but what you want becomes this insurmountable, impossible thing to achieve,’ she said (pictured recently)

‘It’s almost like you are looking down on yourself from above. You want to get well but what you want becomes this insurmountable, impossible thing to achieve,’ she said.

‘The eating disorder will always find a way to make you feel bad about yourself.’

Ms Thomas said she reached rock bottom when doctors told her she had just two weeks to live.

‘I was at a point where I didn’t want to wake up anymore. I didn’t want to deal with the intense hunger or the pain anymore,’ she said.

 The thought of waking up tomorrow to face my reality was all too painfully overwhelming.

‘They told me I would never have children, that my disease was too chronic and enduring and that I would never recover. They told my parents that I wouldn’t get better.’

In a harrowing blog post, Ms Thomas wrote:  ‘At that point I was a 27 year old skeleton with the bones of an 80 year old, 4 stress fractures, a weak heart and no menstrual cycle.’

‘I felt broken beyond repair. A lost cause. I was done with struggling through the torment of each day – running for hours on end on an empty stomach, counting out my daily allowance of apple slices and constantly looking for any opportunity to burn just a few more calories.

Ms Thomas moved to the Sunshine Coast with her mother (pictured left) to try hypnotherapy and neuro-linguistic programming where she spent six months of ‘learning to live again’

‘The thought of waking up tomorrow to face my reality was all too painfully overwhelming.’

But Ms Thomas decided to try her hardest to recover, just one more time.

‘I saw how much it hurt my mum when I said I’d rather die,’ Ms Thomas said.

‘I decided I would give it one more go – despite a treatment team telling me I would never reach full recovery and despite having spent 15 years of my life trying all kinds of different treatments.’

Ms Thomas moved to the Sunshine Coast with her mother to try hypnotherapy and neuro-linguistic programming where she spent six months ‘learning to live again’.

‘Hypnotherapy was so great for me, she didn’t see my case like the doctors did, she just knew I had to “rewire” my brain,’ she said.

‘She dealt with it like anxiety or OCD and I don’t know why it worked but it did. It wasn’t easy – it was the hardest thing I’ve ever done and all of my energy and mental capacity went into recovery.

Ms Thomas said recovery was like starting over – the then 27-year-old using every ounce of her tenacity, courage and strength to beat the illness

‘My thoughts were about food and exercise every second of the day so to change that was a process but within maybe four weeks I was asking to eat again.’

Ms Thomas said recovery was like starting over – the then 27-year-old using every ounce of her tenacity, courage and strength to beat the illness.

 You have nothing in your life that’s not somehow pervaded by the disease.

‘I let Mum take control and knew that I needed to be cared for and within a few months I was a new person,’ Ms Thomas said.

‘I was in a different world – I couldn’t fathom that this is what it was like to really live, that this is what I had been missing out on this entire time.

‘I would go to the beach and wander along rather than setting off at a certain time and exercising. Anorexia takes away any piece of joy – anything that you are passionate about it ruins it for you.

‘You have nothing in your life that’s not somehow pervaded by the disease.’

Ms Thomas decided to take the leap and move to the Sunshine Coast permanently where she is now an a ambassador for EndED, mentors those who suffer from an eating disorder and runs support groups for them and their families.

Ms Thomas decided to take the leap and move to the Sunshine Coast permanently where she is now an a ambassador for EndED and mentors those who suffer from an eating disorder

‘Unless you’ve been through it you don’t get it, I can offer advice that might work,’ Ms Thomas said.

‘Psychologists and doctors are often not helping sufferers properly. It’s a flawed system. It breaks my heart because I have had people tell me they can’t leave the hospital because they know they won’t eat when they leave but doctors discharge them anyway.

‘We are fighting for the privacy laws to be changed as well because at the moment, if a patient is 18 and don’t want their parents to know their treatment plan or progress, hospitals won’t tell them.

‘They are committing people who are mentally unwell and then letting them make all of their own decisions.

Ms Thomas also hopes to break the stigma surrounding eating disorders and stop the shame and guilt felt by both sufferers and their families.

Ms Thomas also hopes to break the stigma surrounding eating disorders and stop the shame and guilt felt by both sufferers and their families

Ms Thomas also hopes to break the stigma surrounding eating disorders and stop the shame and guilt felt by both sufferers and their families

‘Not enough people speak about it and eating disorders are so often swept under the carpet,’ Ms Thomas said.

‘I don’t want to normalise it I simply want to talk about it. The rates of eating disorders in girls under 12 have shot up by 115 per cent over the past decade worldwide and social media is a frightening contributor to that.’

 I have the ability to empathise and connect with others suffering from mental illness, on a level that most can’t.

‘If I had been unwell in the age of social media as it is now I don’t think I would have survived.’

Ms Thomas hopes that everything she went through can help others moving forward.

‘Surely there is a reason why I had to go through the hell that I did and I hope I can help people realise what is going on,’ Ms Thomas said.

‘Although battling anorexia has stripped me of more than half my life to date; I refuse to be bitter. My journey has given me a unique perspective on the world.

‘I have the ability to empathise and connect with others suffering from mental illness, on a level that most can’t.’

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-4446444/Woman-anorexia-15-years-recovered-hypnotherapy.html#ixzz4fahQoFQD
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American Council of Hypnotist Examiners – Virtual Conference April 22-23, 2017

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Saturday, April 22, 2017 – 3-hour Workshops

Hypnosis for Pain Control in Medicine and Dentistry, John Butler
A large body of evidence indicates that hypnosis can significantly help people who are suffering with acute and chronic pain. Dr. John Butler has developed an extensive range of skills to help these clients, and teaches this class from his great experience in the field. The class covers the basis of how hypnosis influences the mind-body connection and the quickest and most effective methods for controlling pain of different kinds and helping suffering clients.
•    Main mechanisms of hypnotic intervention in mind-body pain interactions.
•    Hypnotic pain control – self-training.
•    Techniques and strategies for training clients in hypnotic pain control.
•    Supporting clients with hypnosis during painful medical, surgical and dental treatments.
•    Neurophysiological and neuropsychological mechanisms in hypnoanaesthesia and how to use them clinically

Dr. John Butler is a highly successful hypnotherapist and international hypnotherapy trainer. Hypnoanaesthesia is one of his specialisms and he has been a pioneer in its use in modern clinical settings. He featured in many media demonstrations including a live TV demonstration of surgical hypnoanaesthesia.

Sunday, April 23, 2017 – 1 hour presentations

Hypnosis for Pain Control in Medicine and Dentistry, John Butler
A large body of evidence indicates that hypnosis can significantly help people who are suffering with acute and chronic pain. Dr. John Butler has developed an extensive range of skills to help these clients, and teaches this class from his great experience in the field. The class covers the basis of how hypnosis influences the mind-body connection and the quickest and most effective methods for controlling pain of different kinds and helping suffering clients.
•    Main mechanisms of hypnotic intervention in mind-body pain interactions.
•    Hypnotic pain control – self-training.
•    Techniques and strategies for training clients in hypnotic pain control.
•    Supporting clients with hypnosis during painful medical, surgical and dental treatments.
•    Neurophysiological and neuropsychological mechanisms in hypnoanaesthesia and how to use them clinically.

For further details related to the all of the speakers at the ACHE Virtual Conference 2017, please go to:

http://hypnotistexaminers.org/conference/2017-virtual-conference-catalog/

http://hypnotherapytraininginternational.com/

“Sleeping” Your Way to the Top: 5 Ways Hypnosis Can Help You Climb the Corporate Ladder

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By John Moyer / Business.com / Managing / Last Modified: February 22, 2017

You are now getting sleepy… very, very sleepy. Find out how hypnosis can help you climb the corporate ladder.

There’s a reason why I spent most of my professional life being self-employed: I don’t like submitting to authority. My time on the stand-up comedy stage is a testament to that; where I enjoyed skewering the absurdities of everyone else’s conventional lifestyle.

However, a few years back I was approached about a long-term position with a television production company that wanted my creative skill set. The project was interesting, the travel appealing and the money was decent. The only exception was the company’s owner. He was neither interesting, appealing, nor anywhere near the ballpark of “decent.” The day-to-day stress from producing episodic television was amplified to the Nth degree under his condescension and poor leadership.

After the project wrapped, I quickly returned to the greener pastures of the self-employed. But I kept wondering, “How do most people do it?” How can they endure the daily grind of the corporate environment? Stress, depression, anxiety, lack of sleep, juggling family life and not to mention “horrible bosses” all takes a toll on you.

As I expanded my stand-up comedy schedule to include a stage hypnosis show, I realized how powerful the human mind was. There were more opportunities to utilize hypnosis than to simply make people laugh. Hypnosis, or more specifically hypnotherapy really fosters a state of well-being that can prove some advantage. Having lived what I considered a nightmare within the corporate world, I wanted to be able to help any of my corporate comrades that were left behind. Hypnosis was the proverbial secret weapon.

Hypnosis works by embedding specific messages into an unconscious mind. Within hypnotherapy, these types of messages are positively geared to course correct limiting behavior. These newly embedded affirmations operate within the person’s inner conscious mind as the person goes about everyday life. The hope is that the negative behavior is reduced or even eliminated completely.

Within the workplace, there are 5 areas hypnosis can help improve a person’s mindset to not only help them cope, but by also allowing them to get ahead.

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1. Conquer Fears

Hypnosis has long been used to help those crippled by irrational fears or phobias to lead more normal lives. Given that most phobias develop as a by-product of traumatic experiences, they are psychological in nature. “All in your head”, if you will. But researchers believe that the generation of these fears may not only be due to learned fears from our parents, but also from our parents’ genetics and the varying amounts of chemical transmitters in our brains. Hypnotherapy is considered an easy, natural way to help ease those fears, especially as they apply to the workplace.

For example, customer service requires a certain finesse to deal with unruly clients or customers. If an employee is afraid of confrontation, or feels fear when required to make routine conference calls, this may be debilitating for their workplace attitude. For many, the instinctual solution to fear is avoidance, and if this means ignoring client phone calls or avoiding co-worker interactions, their productivity can seriously decline. After facing a trauma, or life-altering event, consider hypnotherapy as an option to explore to conquer those underlying fears that may limit workplace success.

2. Overcome Anxiety

Another use of hypnotherapy is in soothing anxiety. While the iconic comedy image of Frank Costenza yelling, “Serenity now!” comes to mind, there’s actually proof in the proverbial pudding that hypnosis really does relax you. This can be a huge weapon to combat work related stress. Juggling a multitude of tasks, clients and other requirements of the job (especially under a time constraint or deadline) may prove daunting. While most employees have to handle some workplace stress, over-abundance can mean serious performance issues. After using hypnosis to target negative thoughts and feelings, employees report being able to sleep better, handle tasks better and ultimately shed unnecessary anxiety.

Anxious and over-burdened employees do not hide their affections well. Stress tends to seep in to physical aspects of the body leading to acne breakouts, brittle hair, weight loss and a poor appearance. By using hypnosis to tackle some of the precursors to stress, an employee can prove to be more resilient and capable.

3. Restore Confidence

An increase in confidence is one of the biggest potential boosts to any career. Often, only those who are willing to ask for (or demand) a raise or promotion, get one. Many professional career coaches claim that their client’s number one struggle in the job market is having the confidence required to score that high-paying position. Hypnosis can help reaffirm an individual’s worth, installing a renewed sense of purpose and confidence in the workplace. Individuals who have a keen understanding of their strengths and weaknesses tend to be more successful in their projects and professional relationships.

4. Increase Memory

Another use of hypnosis in helping level-up a career is by using techniques to develop an increased concentration and memory. Studies have shown that hypnosis can help improve memory, which is invaluable in the workplace, especially one where an employee is expected to memorize a complicated set of statistics or client data. By increasing recall memory, an employee can be perceived by his peers and supervisors as better organized, present, and dedicated to the company. Hypnosis to improve memory works by targeting the mechanisms by which the brain stores and recalls information. By using specific techniques, hypnosis “unlocks” certain pathways which may make an employee able to retain and refer to a greater amount of information more quickly, thus making them more productive in the workplace.

5. Refine Business Skills

Hypnotherapy has also proven useful for those looking to refine a set of vital business skills. These skills can be hampered by any of the aforementioned shortcomings including stress, anxiety, forgetfulness, or a lack of confidence. Using hypnosis to eliminate these obstacles can help an individual direct their focus towards the traits which make a stellar employee. Some of these traits include being out-going, friendly, and conversational. Related tasks can vary from public speaking, to hosting a business meeting successfully. To do this, hypnosis relies on a combination of visualization and meditation, to reaffirm positive thoughts while helping to release those which may be detrimental. These types of skills are hugely important to career development and vocational success.

Hypnosis has the potential to address the many issues that keep an individual from being more successful on the job and even at home. These techniques would have proved invaluable for any of my time spent in the corporate environment. However, I have implemented every one of them now in my personal and professional life. I have found myself more focused, more productive and especially more relaxed before and during a show.

URL Source: https://www.business.com/articles/5-ways-hypnosis-can-help-you-climb-the-corporate-ladder/